Workshop Repair Manuals

Chevrolet Workshop Manuals

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]

chevrolet Workshop Repair Guides


Astro Van 2WD V6-4.3L VIN W (2001)

Relays and Modules > Relays and Modules - Accessories and Optional Equipment > Accessory Delay Module > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 14

Page 3
background image

NOTE:  Do not insert test equipment probes into any connector or fuse block terminal. The diameter of the test probes will deform most terminals. A
deformed terminal can cause a poor connection, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connector Test Adapter Kit or the J
42675 Flat Wire Probe Adapter Kit in order to frontprobe terminals. Do not use paper clips or Other substitutes as they can damage terminals and cause
incorrect measurements.

Digital Multimeter

NOTE:  Refer to Test Probe Notice in Service Precautions.

IMPORTANT:  Circuits which include any solid state control modules, such as the PCM, should only be tested with a 10 megohm or higher impedance
digital multimeter such as the J 39200.

The J 39200 instruction manual is a good source of information and should be read thoroughly upon receipt of the DMM as well as kept on hand for
future reference.

A DMM should be used instead of a test lamp in order to test for voltage in high impedance circuits. While a test lamp shows whether voltage is present,
a DMM indicates how much voltage is present.

The ohmmeter function on a DMM shows how much resistance exists between 2 points along a circuit. Low resistance in a circuit means good
continuity.

IMPORTANT:  Disconnect the power feed from the suspect circuit when measuring resistance with a DMM. This prevents incorrect readings. DMMs
apply such a small voltage to measure resistance that the presence of voltages can upset a resistance reading.

Diodes and solid state components in a circuit can cause a DMM to display a false reading. To find out if a component is affecting a measurement take a
reading once, then reverse the leads and take a second reading. If the readings differ the solid state component is affecting the measurement.

Following are examples of the various methods of connecting the DMM to the circuit to be tested:

^

Backprobe both ends of the connector and either hold the leads in place while manipulating the connector or tape the leads to the harness for
continuous monitoring while you perform Other operations or test driving. Refer to Probing Electrical Connectors.  See: General Electrical
Diagnostic Procedures/Circuit Testing/Probing Electrical Connectors

^

Disconnect the harness at both ends of the suspected circuit where it connects either to a component or to Other harnesses.

^

If the system that is being diagnosed has a specified pinout or breakout box, it may be used in order to simplify connecting the DMM to the circuit
or for testing multiple circuits quickly.

Fused Jumper Wires

TOOLS REQUIRED

J 36169-A Fused Jumper Wire

IMPORTANT:  A fused jumper may not protect solid state components from being damaged.

The J 36169-A includes small clamp connectors that provide adaptation to most connectors without damage. This fused jumper wire is supplied with a 
20-A fuse which may not be suitable for some circuits. Do not use a fuse with a higher rating than the fuse that protects the circuit being tested.

Inducing Intermittent Fault Conditions

In order to duplicate the customer's concern, it may be necessary to manipulate the wiring harness if the malfunction appears to be vibration related.
Manipulation of a circuit can consist of a wide variety of actions, including:

^

Wiggling the harness

^

Disconnecting a connector and reconnecting

^

Stressing the mechanical connection of a connector

^

Pulling on the harness or wire in order to identify a separation/break inside the insulation

^

Relocating a harness or wires

All these actions should be performed with some goal in mind. For instance, with a scan tool connected, wiggling the wires may uncover a faulty input to
the control module. The snapshot option would be appropriate here. Refer to Scan Tool Snapshot Procedure. You may need to load the vehicle in order
to duplicate the concern.  See: General Electrical Diagnostic Procedures/Circuit Testing/Scan Tool Snapshot Procedure

This may require the use of weights, floorjacks, jackstands, frame machines, etc. In these cases you are attempting to duplicate the concern by
manipulating the suspension or frame. This method is useful in finding harnesses that are too short and their connectors pull apart enough to cause a poor
connection. A DMM set to Peak Min/Max mode and connected to the suspect circuit while testing can yield desirable results. Refer to Testing for
Electrical Intermittents.  See: Diagrams/Diagnostic Aids

Certainly, using the senses of sight, smell, and hearing while manipulating the circuit can provide good results as well.

Relays and Modules > Relays and Modules - Accessories and Optional Equipment > Accessory Delay Module > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 14

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]