Workshop Repair Manuals

Chevrolet Workshop Manuals

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]

chevrolet Workshop Repair Guides


Corvette V8-6.2L (2008)

Powertrain Management > Computers and Control Systems > Sensors and Switches - Computers and Control Systems > Oxygen Sensor > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 4462

Page 12
background image

component. Refer to Circuit Testing  (See: Testing and Inspection/Component Tests and General Diagnostics) and Ground Distribution
Schematics  (See: Diagrams/Electrical Diagrams/Starting and Charging/Power and Ground Distribution/System Diagram/Ground Distribution
Schematics) .

Temperature Sensitivity

*

An intermittent condition may occur when a component/connection reaches normal operating temperature. The condition may occur only when the
component/connection is cold, or only when the component/connection is hot.

*

Freeze Frame, Failure Records, Snapshot, or Vehicle Data Recorder data may help with this type of intermittent condition, where applicable.

*

If the intermittent is related to heat, review the data for a relationship with the following:

-

High ambient temperatures

-

Underhood/engine generated heat

-

Circuit generated heat due to a poor connection, or high electrical load

-

Higher than normal load conditions, towing, etc.

*

If the intermittent is related to cold, review the data for the following:

-

Low ambient temperatures-In extremely low temperatures, ice may form in a connection or component. Inspect for water intrusion.

-

The condition only occurs on a cold start.

-

The condition goes away when the vehicle warms up.

*

Information from the customer may help to determine if the trouble follows a pattern that is temperature related. 

*

If temperature is suspected of causing an intermittent fault condition, attempt to duplicate the condition. Refer to Inducing Intermittent Fault
Conditions  (See: Testing and Inspection/Component Tests and General Diagnostics) in order to duplicate the conditions required.

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Electrical Noise

Some electrical components/circuits are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI) or other types of electrical noise. Inspect for the following
conditions:

*

A misrouted harness that is too close to high voltage/high current devices such as secondary ignition components, motors, generator etc-These
components may induce electrical noise on a circuit that could interfere with normal circuit operation.

*

Electrical system interference caused by a malfunctioning relay, or a control module driven solenoid or switch-These conditions can cause a sharp
electrical surge. Normally, the condition will occur when the malfunctioning component is operating.

*

Improper installation of non-factory or aftermarket add on accessories such as lights, 2-way radios, amplifiers, electric motors, remote starters,
alarm systems, cell phones, etc-These accessories may lead to interference while in use, but do not fail when the accessories are not in use. Refer
to Checking Aftermarket Accessories  (See: Testing and Inspection/Component Tests and General Diagnostics) .

*

Test for an open diode across the A/C compressor clutch and for other open diodes. Some relays may contain a clamping diode.

*

The generator may be allowing AC noise into the electrical system. 

Incorrect Control Module

*

There are only a few situations where reprogramming a control module is appropriate:

-

A new service control module is installed.

-

A control module from another vehicle is installed.

-

Revised software/calibration files have been released for this vehicle.

Important::  DO NOT re-program the control module with the SAME software/calibration files that are already present in the control
module. This is not an effective repair for any type of concern.

*

Verify that the control module contains the correct software/calibration. If incorrect programming is found, reprogram the control module with the
most current software/calibration. Refer to Control Module References  (See: Testing and Inspection/Programming and Relearning) for
replacement, setup, and programming.

Testing for Short to Ground

Testing for Short to Ground

Notice:  Refer to Test Probe Notice  .

The following procedures test for a short to ground in a circuit.

With a DMM

Powertrain Management > Computers and Control Systems > Sensors and Switches - Computers and Control Systems > Oxygen Sensor > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 4462

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]