Workshop Repair Manuals

Ford Workshop Manuals

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]

ford Workshop Repair Guides


Ranger 2WD V6-177 2.9L (1989)

Accessories and Optional Equipment > Antenna > Antenna, Radio > Antenna Cable > Component Information > Technical Service Bulletins > Customer Interest for Antenna Cable: > 9325 > Jan > 93 > Radio - Poor AM Reception

Page 1
background image

Antenna Cable: Customer Interest
Radio - Poor AM Reception

Article No. 
93-2-5

01/18/93

RADIO - POOR AM RECEPTION CAUSED BY POOR ANTENNA CONNECTIONS

FORD:
1990 CROWN VICTORIA

LINCOLN-MERCURY: 
1990 GRAND MARQUIS

LIGHT TRUCK:
1989-90 BRONCO II 
1989-92 RANGER 
1991-92 EXPLORER

ISSUE:
Poor AM radio reception, such as fading or static, may be caused by poor antenna connections.

ACTION:
Perform the following diagnostic and repair procedures. If necessary, replace the antenna and antenna cable as required.

VERIFICATION

In some cases, a customer's concern may be caused by normal radio operating conditions. This is especially true if the customer complains of static in
certain locations or while tuned to certain stations.

Obtain as much information from the customer as possible regarding the audio system's performance. The following descriptions will then help the
technician and the customer decide whether the radio system concerns are caused by a defective audio system or are the results of normal operating
conditions.

FADING

AM fade will occur under viaducts and in urban areas with tall buildings. Certain AM stations may lower their power in the evening which will cause
poor reception at night.

STATIC

AM static may be caused by power lines, electric fences, neon signs, and thunderstorms. Static may become very noticeable if the AM station is weak or
distant.

AM Signal Issue - Diagnostic Tips

First, it is important that you compare the reception performance of the complaint vehicle with the reception performance of other vehicles with known
good reception. Use the same set of test stations in the same locations when you test the vehicle, in order to become accustomed to how the stations
should sound and what external interference is to be expected. This should be done with the engine running and with the engine not running in the same
location.

It is important to note that even with a perfect AM radio receiver and a perfect antenna, reception conditions are constantly varying. Interference from
noise sources, both internal and external to the vehicle, are often erratic and unpredictable.

The most important tool used in diagnosing AM radio concern is a reliable weak AM signal source. A high-power AM Broadcast station one or two
hundred miles away is ideal. The station should be clear so that you can understand what is being said with little or no difficulty.

It is important to note that there are other sources of noise, external to the vehicle, that can interfere with the signal you are trying to receive. These
external noises should be either taken into account or avoided. For example, power lines, transformers or fluorescent lights can radiate noise in the AM
broadcast band. It is best to test the concern vehicle in an area well clear of such noise sources.

Summary:

Select a set of test stations, especially the stations that may be the reason for the customer concern, and some which are over 100 miles away.

Accessories and Optional Equipment > Antenna > Antenna, Radio > Antenna Cable > Component Information > Technical Service Bulletins > Customer Interest for Antenna Cable: > 9325 > Jan > 93 > Radio - Poor AM Reception

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]