Workshop Repair Manuals

GMC Workshop Manuals

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]

gmc Workshop Repair Guides


Savana 3500 V8-4.8L (2009)

Transmission and Drivetrain > Automatic Transmission/Transaxle > Actuators and Solenoids - A/T > Torque Converter Clutch Solenoid, A/T > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 4608

Page 10
background image

diagnosis and Vehicle Data Recorder operation.

Testing for Proper Terminal Contact

It is important to test terminal contact at the component and any inline connectors before replacing a suspect component. Mating terminals must be
inspected to ensure good terminal contact. A poor connection between the male and female terminal at a connector may be the result of contamination or
deformation.

Contamination may be caused by the connector halves being improperly connected. A missing or damaged connector seal, damage to the connector
itself, or exposing the terminals to moisture and dirt can also cause contamination. Contamination, usually in the underhood or underbody connectors,
leads to terminal corrosion, causing an open circuit or intermittently open circuit. 

Deformation is caused by probing the mating side of a connector terminal without the proper adapter. Always use the J 35616   when probing connectors.
Other causes of terminal deformation are improperly joining the connector halves, or repeatedly separating and joining the connector halves.
Deformation, usually to the female terminal contact tang, can result in poor terminal contact causing an open or intermittently open circuit. 

Testing for Proper Terminal Contact in Bussed Electrical Centers (BEC)

It is very important to use the correct test adapter when testing for proper terminal contact of fuses and relays in a bussed electrical center (BEC). Use
J-35616-35 to test for proper terminal contact. Failure to use J-35616-35 can result in improper diagnosis of the BEC.

Follow the procedure below in order to test terminal contact:

1. Separate the connector halves.
2. Visually inspect the connector halves for contamination. Contamination may result in a white or green build-up within the connector body or

between terminals. This causes high terminal resistance, intermittent contact, or an open circuit. An underhood or underbody connector that shows
signs of contamination should be replaced in its entirety: terminals, seals, and connector body.

3. Using an equivalent male terminal from the J-38125   , test that the retention force is significantly different between a good terminal and a suspect

terminal. Replace the female terminal in question.

Flat Wire (Dock and Lock) Connectors

There are no serviceable parts for flat wire (dock and lock) connectors on the harness side or the component side.

Follow the procedure below in order to test terminal contact:

1. Remove the component in question.
2. Visually inspect each side of the connector for signs of contamination. Avoid touching either side of the connector as oil from your skin may be a

source of contamination as well.

3. Visually inspect the terminal bearing surfaces of the flat wire circuits for splits, cracks, or other imperfections that could cause poor terminal

contact. Visually inspect the component side connector to ensure that all of the terminals are uniform and free of damage or deformation.

4. Insert the appropriate adapter from the on the flat wire harness connector in order to test the circuit in question.

Control Module/Component Voltage and Grounds

Poor voltage or ground connections can cause widely varying symptoms.

*

Test all control module voltage supply circuits. Many vehicles have multiple circuits supplying voltage to a control module. Other components in
the system may have separate voltage supply circuits that may also need to be tested. Inspect connections at the module/component connectors,
fuses, and any intermediate connections between the voltage source and the module/component. A test lamp or a DMM may indicate that voltage
is present, but neither tests the ability of the circuit to carry sufficient current. Ensure that the circuit can carry the current necessary to operate the
component. Refer to Circuit Testing   (See: Testing and Inspection/Component Tests and General Diagnostics) and Power Distribution Schematics
  (See: Diagrams/Electrical Diagrams/Starting and Charging/Power and Ground Distribution/System Diagram/Power Distribution Schematics).

*

Test all control module ground and system ground circuits. The control module may have multiple ground circuits. Other components in the
system may have separate grounds that may also need to be tested. Inspect grounds for clean and tight connections at the grounding point. Inspect
the connections at the component and in splice packs, where applicable. Ensure that the circuit can carry the current necessary to operate the
component. Refer to Circuit Testing   (See: Testing and Inspection/Component Tests and General Diagnostics) and Ground Distribution
Schematics   (See: Diagrams/Electrical Diagrams/Starting and Charging/Power and Ground Distribution/System Diagram/Ground Distribution
Schematics).

Temperature Sensitivity

*

An intermittent condition may occur when a component/connection reaches normal operating temperature. The condition may occur only when the
component/connection is cold, or only when the component/connection is hot.

*

Freeze Frame, Failure Records, Snapshot, or Vehicle Data Recorder data may help with this type of intermittent condition, where applicable.

*

If the intermittent is related to heat, review the data for a relationship with the following:

Transmission and Drivetrain > Automatic Transmission/Transaxle > Actuators and Solenoids - A/T > Torque Converter Clutch Solenoid, A/T > Component Information > Diagrams > Diagram Information and Instructions > Page 4608

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]