jeep Workshop Repair Guides

Jeep Workshop Manuals

< PREV PAGE NEXT PAGE >
Page 2
background image

steering wheel rotation.

A service replacement SCM is shipped with the clockspring pre-centered and with a molded plastic locking pin installed. The locking pin secures the
centered clockspring rotor to the SCM case during shipment and handling, but must be removed after the SCM is installed on the steering column and
before the steering wheel is installed. The service replacement clockspring is also shipped in a standard configuration and must be electronically
configured for optional equipment, including automatic headlamps, front fog lamps, rear fog lamps, and SAS before these features will be operational.
Using a diagnostic scan tool, follow the programming steps outlined for Configure SCM under Miscellaneous Functions for the SCM/Steering Control
Module menu item as appropriate.
 
The SCM has programmable memory that can be reprogrammed using a diagnostic scan tool and Flash reprogramming procedures. The SCM cannot be
adjusted or repaired. If ineffective or damaged the entire SCM including the integral clockspring and, if the vehicle is so equipped, the SAS must be
replaced. The left and right multi-function switches, the hazard switch and the turn signal cancel cam can be removed from and are serviced separately
from the SCM.

OPERATION

The Steering Control Module (SCM) contains the clockspring and a microprocessor. On some vehicles, it also contains the Steering Angle Sensor
(SAS). The SCM communicates over the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus with other electronic modules in the vehicle and/or a diagnostic scan
tool.

The SCM is connected to a fused B(+) circuit and receives a path to ground at all times. These connections allow it to remain functional regardless of the
ignition switch position. The driver airbag squib circuits of the clockspring, the speed control switch circuits and the hazard switch circuits pass through
the SCM, but the SCM does not monitor, and has no control outputs related to these circuits. Any other input to the SCM that would cause a vehicle
system to function but does not require that the ignition switch be in the ON position, such as turning ON the lights or sounding the horn, prompts the
SCM to wake up and transmit on the CAN data bus.

The following paragraphs briefly describe the SCM responses to the various hard wired inputs it receives.

-

Horn Switch - The horn switch is an input to the SCM. The SCM provides a reference input to the horn switch at all times and monitors the horn
switch status on a second circuit. When the horn switch is closed, the SCM transmits a horn switch status message over the CAN data bus. The
Forward Control Module (FCM) in the engine compartment controls horn relay operation based upon the horn switch status message from the
SCM.

-

Ignition Switch - The ignition switch is an input to the SCM. The SCM provides a reference input to a multiplexed circuit within the ignition
switch and monitors the switch status on a second circuit to determine the switch position. The SCM then transmits the appropriate ignition switch
status messages to other electronic modules over the CAN data bus. The SCM can also detect a short or open in the switch by monitoring the
return input and will transmit a Signal Not Available (SNA) message when a fault is detected.

-

Left Multi-Function Switch - The left (lighting) multi-function switch provides several inputs to the SCM. The SCM provides reference inputs to
the turn signal, beam select, exterior lighting and interior lighting controls of the left multi-function switch at all times and monitors the status of
the switches on return circuits. The SCM then transmits the appropriate switch status messages to other electronic modules over the CAN data bus.
The SCM can also detect a shorted, open or stuck switch in each of the switch controls (except front fog lamps) by monitoring the return input and
will transmit a SNA message when a fault is detected. In general, the FCM in the engine compartment controls all exterior lighting operation and
the Electromechanical Instrument Cluster (EMIC) (also referred to as Cab Control Node/CCN) controls all interior lighting operation based upon
the various switch status messages from the SCM.

-

Remote Radio Switches - The steering wheel mounted remote radio controls provide inputs to the SCM. The SCM provides a reference input to a
multiplexed circuits within the switches and monitors the switch status on a second circuit to determine both switch positions. The SCM then
transmits the appropriate remote radio switch status messages to other electronic modules over the CAN data bus. The SCM can also detect an
open or stuck switch by monitoring the return input and will transmit a Signal Not Available (SNA) message when a fault is detected. The radio
receiver controls its own operation based upon the remote radio switch status messages from the SCM.

-

Right Multi-Function Switch - The right (wiper) multi-function switch provides several inputs to the SCM. The SCM provides reference inputs to
the front wiper/washer and rear wiper/washer controls of the right multifunction switch at all times and monitors the status of the switches on
return circuits. The SCM then transmits the appropriate switch status messages to other electronic modules over the CAN data bus. The SCM also
provides two hard wired high side driver outputs to the rear wiper motor to control the rear wiper ON and DELAY functions. The SCM can also
detect a shorted, open or stuck switch in each of the switch controls by monitoring the return input and will transmit a SNA message when a fault
is detected. The FCM in the engine compartment controls wiper on/off, wiper high/low and rear wiper relay operation based upon the switch status
messages from the SCM.

-

Steering Angle Sensor - Vehicles equipped with an optional Electronic Stability Program (ESP) system have a Steering Angle Sensor (SAS) and a
second, dedicated microprocessor integral to the SCM. The SAS monitors the steering direction/angle and the rate of steering wheel rotation, then
the SCM transmits this data to other electronic modules in the vehicle over the CAN data bus. The SCM can detect an ineffective SAS and will
transmit a SNA message when a fault is detected. When an SCM is installed into a vehicle without properly centering and locking the entire
steering system, the SAS data does not agree with the true position of the steering system and causes the ESP system to shut down. This can also
damage the clockspring without any immediate malfunction. Unlike some other DaimlerChrysler vehicles, this SAS never requires calibration.
Determining if the clockspring/steering angle sensor is centered is also possible electrically using the diagnostic scan tool. Steering wheel position
is displayed as ANGLE with a range of up to 900 degrees. Refer to the appropriate menu item on the diagnostic scan tool.

The SCM will store fault information in the form of a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) in SCM memory if a malfunction is detected. The SCM can be
diagnosed, and any stored DTC can be retrieved using a diagnostic scan tool.

Relays and Modules > Relays and Modules - Steering and Suspension > Relays and Modules - Steering > Steering Mounted Controls Communication Module > Component Information > Specifications > Page 544

< PREV PAGE NEXT PAGE >