Workshop Repair Manuals

Volvo Workshop Manuals

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]

volvo Workshop Repair Guides


XC90 2.5T AWD L5-2.5L Turbo VIN 59 B5254T2 (2003)

Powertrain Management > Computers and Control Systems > Information Bus > Component Information > Description and Operation > The Controller Area Network (CAN) > Page 4869

Page 28
background image

Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) XXX-E003 stored in control modules other than the central electronic module (CEM)

Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) XXX-E003 is stored when an incorrect CAN configuration ID is received from a control module within 5 seconds of
start up. This means that the control module cannot receive the data message with the correct Master Configuration ID that the central electronic module
(CEM) transmits. This is normally due to an open-circuit on the CAN cables or some other interference in communication.
The diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is intended to detect whether the central electronic module (CEM) has defective software, but is more common when
there are faults in the CAN network or faults in the power supply to the control modules. A combination of E003- codes makes it easier to localize the
fault, see the information on "Multiple diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and extended diagnostics". On the other hand, the diagnostic trouble code (DTC)
is not stored at the same time in all control modules. This depends on the power supply to the control modules (e.g. X/15/15I/30).
The diagnostic trouble code (DTC) can be stored if incorrect software is downloaded into a control module or if a control module is moved from one car
to another. This is why moving control modules between cars is not permitted. If several or all control modules have stored diagnostic trouble code
(DTC) E003, this may be due to an incorrect signal configuration having been downloaded into the central electronic module (CEM). This is not
particularly likely in practice, however, but is more often due to a physical fault in the CAN network.
X/15I/15 supplied control modules can detect the fault five seconds after the control module has been powered up (ignition on). The control module
compares its own CAN configuration ID (SW version) with the CAN configuration ID that is continuously transmitted by the central electronic module
(CEM). Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) E003 is stored by the control module if the central electronic module (CEM) ID is absent or is different from the
anticipated value five seconds after the control module has been powered up. An incorrect CAN configuration ID may be the result of a control module
having been taken from one car and installed in another, although the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is usually stored due to the signal being completely
absent. A control module that is supplied directly from the battery (30) does not follow the same start up procedure as other control modules, but
receives information about the position of the ignition key via the CAN network. This means that a 30-supplied control module will not store diagnostic
trouble code (DTC) E003 5 seconds after the ignition is switched on if there is a permanent fault. The control modules will store the diagnostic trouble
code (DTC) after a time-out lasting approximately ten minutes instead.

Note! This means that for a 30-supplied control module, the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be stored or not depending on when then fault
occurred.

A typical reason for E003 being stored is an open-circuit in the CAN cables. In this case, the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is often stored together the
codes CEM-1A51 to CEM-1A66.

Diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) E000 and E001 in a control module (E000=HS-CAN, E001=LS-CAN)

Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) E001 indicates a fault in the data communication on the CAN network. This can be due to interference of various types
or if a control module is sending incorrect messages. Monitoring for this type of fault takes place continuously. The diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) are
originally intended to indicate contact bounces of if incorrect messages are sent over the network, but can also be stored in the event of a short-circuit
between the two CAN cables or if communication only functions on one of the two cables. It takes a couple of seconds from the fault occurring to its
detection.
Another important cause of these codes is if a control module has been disconnected from the network without the battery cable having been
disconnected from the negative terminal (in such cases removing the ignition key does not help) or if the signal on the CAN cables is "weak" or
disrupted. This can occur if communication is only working on one of the CAN cables or if one of the network resistors in the network is not working.
The network resistors on the low speed network are located in the upper electronic module (UEM) and the rear electronic module (REM). On the high
speed network, the resistors are located in the anti-lock brake system module (ABS)/brake control module (BCM) and in the electronic throttle module
(ETM), except for Bosch EMS MY02 and later where the resistors are located in the brake control module (BCM) and the engine control module
(ECM).
In certain cases, the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) may be stored if a control module sends data at the wrong transfer speed or if the crystal in a control
module is defective.

Diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) in the event of lost signal, rapid indication of faults on the CAN network

Some control modules, such as the engine control module (ECM), the electronic throttle module (ETM), the anti-lock brake system module (ABS) and
the transmission control module (TCM) continually check the existence of each other and store diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) in the event of missing
signals. These diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) are often due to different driving conditions and combinations of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) are
often stored which can make fault-tracing more difficult. When attempting to recreate the fault, there is no guarantee that the same combination of
diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) will be stored. The detection of these diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) is often more sensitive and they are usually
stored more easily than CEM-1A51 to CEM-1A66 or CEM-DF03 to CEM-DF16. This can therefore be an indication of a short-term intermittent fault
having occurred on the CAN network.
Below is a selection of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) that may or may not be stored in the event of an intermittent fault on the CAN network:

-

ECM-928C (Bosch), ECM-922A (Denso), only when the engine is running. These diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) indicate that the control signal
for the cruise control is missing or could not be received by the engine control module (ECM)

-

ECM-901A, ECM-901E, ECM-902A, ECM-911A, ECM-912A and ECM-913A for Bosch and ECM-901A, ECM-902A, ECM-911A, ECM-912A
for Denso

-

SRS-00D6, time-out for the seat belt buckle. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) indicates that the supplemental restraints system module (SRS)
has not received the status of the seat belt buckles from the central electronic module (CEM). The sensor for the seat belt buckles is directly linked
to the central electronic module (CEM)

-

SRS-00D5, status of the SRS indicator lamp in the driver information module (DIM)

-

Discrepancies in the signal from the pedal position sensor between the directly connected signal and the signal over the CAN network. See the

Powertrain Management > Computers and Control Systems > Information Bus > Component Information > Description and Operation > The Controller Area Network (CAN) > Page 4869

[PREV PAGE] [NEXT PAGE]